The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Discussion of any bush poetry topic.
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Shelley
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Shelley » Sat Aug 01, 2020 5:54 pm

Hi Gary

I was reading an article about Mr and Mrs CJ Dennis and discovered something I was not aware of previously, though of course it is something you probably already know.

Mrs Dennis’ birth name was Olive Harriet Herron. She adopted the first name of “Margaret” as a pen name for her books. One thing I did know was that to Dennis, she was always “Biddy”.

Just a bit of trivia!

Cheers
Shelley
Shelley Hansen
Lady of Lines
http://www.shelleyhansen.com

"Look fer yer profits in the 'earts o' friends,
fer 'atin' never paid no dividends."
(CJ Dennis "The Mooch o' Life")

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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by dkitchen » Tue Aug 04, 2020 11:16 am

Test by Administrator

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Gary Harding
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Gary Harding » Tue Aug 04, 2020 7:46 pm

That's interesting Shelley.

I also used Google Street View to take a trip to the Toolangi State School where that book prize was handed over, nearly 90 years ago.

I will talk more about what the book prize actually was later on. It reflected a feature of those times around 1933 and was a fascinating journey of discovery in itself. The internet makes joining the dots much easier.

Gary
Last edited by Gary Harding on Wed Aug 12, 2020 6:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Gary Harding » Tue Aug 11, 2020 6:40 pm

(This is a test post to help solve some tech problems I have been having in posting)

Here are two old accordions for display.(Musical culture)
The first is a Hohner Vienna approx. 90 years old, donated. Original owner was Leonard Lohman (see pic) and value is about $700.
The second is a small accordion, bought at auction.

Jim Grahame wrote a poem entitled Concertina Jack.

He played while they danced till the sun went down
And the west was arched by a golden glow
And some of them shuffled and swayed and swung
Till night closed in and they had to go.
Then the 'possums and owls and the night-hawks came
And some of the things that crawl and creep;
But over the keys his fingers flew
With never a thought of rest or sleep.
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Gary Harding
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Gary Harding » Wed Aug 12, 2020 7:33 am

..continuing test posts...

This old HMV windup 78rpm record player was purchased at a local auction in Maryborough. It will be used as a prop in a particular display.

I was regarding it from a distance before auction and thought "Nah, that will never work". Then while I looked, a really old guy toddled up to it, deftly extracted the handle from its clip in the box, inserted it, gave it a few winds and the turntable spun around!! The main spring was fine. Then he slowly turned his head towards me and gave me a huge grin and a wink.

So it goes like a little beauty and is surprisingly loud!!

This is exactly the sort of machine that Phonograph Jack would have carried "on top of his swag".

Phonograph Jack (by Jim Grahame)

Across the plains and over the hills,
With a little box on his back,
Where there isn't a town for miles and miles,
You will find old Phonograph Jack.
He carries a few of the old sweet tunes
In the folds of a sugar-bag,
And his battered old piping phonograph
Is packed on top of his swag.

He is known to the men of the unfenced land,
To the women who live out west,
Where the rivers spill in the big lagoons
And "the pelican builds her nest."
And the news goes round by mulga wire
To homes that are far and near,
"We're having a bit of a spread tonight,
Old Phonograph Jack is here."

There's ever a bed and a meal for him,
At the end of a long day's tramp.
If there's not a house for a score of miles,
Then he knows where the bullockies camp.
The teamsters listen with never a word
As the name of the tune he tells,
Then his music blends with the curlew's cry
And the low ding-dong of the bells.

They'll listen sad-eyed to old "Home, Sweet Home,"
For the years in the bush are long,
And memories waken and thoughts fly back
With the strains of that dear old song.
There'll be hammocks swinging from wheel to wheel,
But one hanging high in the back,
With a net well spread from foot to head,
Is ready for Phonograph Jack.
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Shelley » Wed Aug 19, 2020 9:56 pm

Great pickup, Gary! And I love Jim Grahame's poem!
Shelley Hansen
Lady of Lines
http://www.shelleyhansen.com

"Look fer yer profits in the 'earts o' friends,
fer 'atin' never paid no dividends."
(CJ Dennis "The Mooch o' Life")

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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Gary Harding » Thu Aug 20, 2020 9:35 pm

Shelley, the music part of things is becoming really interesting. I always expected a separate music room in the Centre. However with the current negotiation for the purchase of a magnificent restored pianola, cross fingers.... the thought is to now introduce this into the foyer where we want an old-fashioned atmosphere. Should look stunning.. plus we can demonstrate how to play a piano no-hands! Or learn to play by watching the keys move. Neat trick?

I saw one working as a child and it made a big impression on me. If one cannot play the piano, this comes a close second.. just pump the pedals! No lessons needed.

Fun and education starts the minute you walk in to the Centre!

I bought a pianola roll in anticipation with :

Waltzing Matilda
Back to Yarrawonga
Road to Gundagai

We are quite original and creative in our thinking and doing. Our original concept. So ..for a great Australian sing-along... there is only one place to go! And don't forget to tip the pianola player.
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Gary Harding » Sun Aug 23, 2020 10:26 am

As mentioned before, Australian cuisine could be considered a part of national Culture. It has its own section.

The early Off The Beaten Track recipe book (as shown previously) is an example, and its enlightening predecessor with its reference to roast echidna on a chilly morning.

This 1912 Australian Cookery book is one of those rarities in the Collection and it is presented as part of Australian Cuisine Culture, at least as it was a mere 100 years ago.

I thought that it would be interesting to go through and chuckle at the recipes, but really other than a stilted, formal writing style which is more the polite expression of the times, it is sort of sensible (if sometimes off-beat) stuff. There are faint echoes of the things that mothers and grandmothers knew (I recall them), and who is to say those recipes were not more nutritious than much of today's food? Those "convalescents and invalids" might have been better off then?

I would only draw the line at Calf's Foot Jelly... but even then reluctantly as some folk might still consider that a treat?

Like Music, it is always a matter of.... taste?

The old-fashioned delicacies may yet become new and fashionable? Who is to say?

To reminisce...

A Dream Of The Melbourne Cup (by A B Paterson)

Bring me a quart of colonial beer
And some doughy damper to make good cheer,
I must make a heavy dinner;
Heavily dine and heavily sup,
Of indigestible things fill up,
Next month they run the Melbourne Cup,
And I have to dream the winner.

Stoke it in, boys! the half-cooked ham,
The rich ragout and the charming cham,
I've got to mix my liquor;
Give me a gander's gaunt hind leg,
Hard and tough as a wooden peg,
And I'll keep it down with a hard-boiled egg,
'Twill make me dream the quicker.
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Gary Harding » Mon Aug 24, 2020 10:34 am

Dancing is an interesting aspect of Australian culture. I do not know if they still do, but Folk Festivals used to have a Big Dance.

For those who remember or who have heard of "Dad and Dave" from Snake Gully, here is an interesting item :

There was a famous song-writer by the name of Jack O'Hagen and he wrote the song The Snake Gully Swagger.
From my collection of odd things... I have attached two different cover-scans relating to this near 80 year old sheet music and story.

As an extra, a picture of the dance steps for the fabulous Snake Gully Swagger from the back cover.

"The Australian Singing Dance Success!" according to the music. I love the cover-art on old sheet music.

I would like to challenge any ABPA member to learn this dance!

... if you are stuck inside the house or unit, why not put the time to good use, print off the steps from the picture, find a partner and learn The Snake Gully Swagger.

An Australian dance icon that will really impress your friends! a bit of the real Australia.
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Re: The Spoken Word in Bush Poetry

Post by Shelley » Thu Aug 27, 2020 7:57 am

Love it, Gary! Not sure how it would go with "two left feet" but certainly a challenge!

Not poetry/music-related, but have you been to Bundaberg's Hinkler Hall of Aviation and attempted the "Hinkler Hustle"? This was a dance of the 1920s created to commemorate "Our Bert", to the tune of a piece of music titled "Hustling Hinkler" composed in his honour. You can practice the steps to the music during your tour of the museum!

Cheers
Shelley
Shelley Hansen
Lady of Lines
http://www.shelleyhansen.com

"Look fer yer profits in the 'earts o' friends,
fer 'atin' never paid no dividends."
(CJ Dennis "The Mooch o' Life")

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