Henry Lawson...myth and reality

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Heather

Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Heather » Thu May 19, 2016 7:43 pm

From what i read Neville, Mary Gilmore was a very tall lady and stood out - i think your painting shows that.

Vic, I am aware of the "myths" surrounding, and perpetuated by Henry himself - such as the gypsy blood - maybe a story told to him when he was a child? I think all of Roderick's work must be a hard slog! But I agree it is well researched and appears to be accurate. I think he knew Lawson - or was it Robertson he knew? I can't remember.

I also have the Complete Works of Paterson - which I got for the grand sum of zero dollars. :) I'll tackle Henry first :) I've never read any of his short stories (except The Loaded Dog). I'm not a short story reader but i did read one today, and enjoyed it. I think if i am to understand Henry, it is important to read his stories and poems in chronological order.

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Stephen Whiteside
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Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Stephen Whiteside » Fri May 20, 2016 9:05 am

If you're reading the stories, Heather, check out "Brighten's Sister-In-Law". That's a terrific read.

For shorter reads, "The Union Buries Its Dead" and "The Ironbark Chip".
Stephen Whiteside, Australian Poet and Writer
http://www.stephenwhiteside.com.au

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David Campbell
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Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by David Campbell » Fri May 20, 2016 11:22 am

I put Lawson's The Selector's Daughter in Award Winning Bush Verse and Stories 2013, Heather. You should have a copy as your The Last Post was in it.

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David

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Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Vic Jefferies » Fri May 20, 2016 11:24 am

Heather, Henry's stories are superb and in my opinion (though that doesn't count for much, and neither it should) should be taught in school as not only an insight into our history but also as literature. I remember when I first read one of his short stories many, many years ago I was absolutely amazed at what he managed to accomplish so eloquently in so few pages.
You have another treasure trove in store with Banjo's collected works, but start at the first page and read through. I think you will be surprised.

Heather

Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Heather » Fri May 20, 2016 12:01 pm

As it happens Stephen, i am up to page 81 in the first volume of 906 pages! and it is the poem Brighten's Sister-in-law. Did he write it as a story as well?

It's lucky I'm not going anywhere fast and have time to read. :)

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Gary Harding
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Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Gary Harding » Tue May 24, 2016 4:53 pm

Well I dunno..

I just love Henry Lawson and the wonderful Poems that he wrote.
Henry and I are great mates! We relate.

He does not look into my backyard, and I do not look into his.

His personal life I dismiss as being the precinct of academics to analyse.

Henry had a few words to say about academics too!.. for which they never forgave him according to Leonard Teale.

Geez.. if my own rough poetry which is (heaven forbid) to be coloured by the many bad things in my life and not adjudged for any literary merit that it may have (which is pittifully small) then what sort of a phoney literary world do we live in??

I would fail miserably without even putting pen to paper. Why even try to write?

Too many sins!

May as well write silly poems about examining the panties of pregnant women or the size of the sexual members of ex-husbands.. like the PM's Award for "cultural" Australian Poetry, $80k tax free.

That is Australia's so-called great "literary" status.

What shameful garbage!!! Australia's poetry scene is total rubbish.

Give me Henry Lawson and Banjo Paterson any day!! They are great poets.

Love 'em. To (attempt to) be a bush poet, one starts with them and ends with them.

They are real Bush Poets and set the example.

THAT guys.. is REAL bush poetry. Dinki-di. Lawson and Paterson. Back to basics.

And this is a Bush Poets' Association.. is it not?

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Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Vic Jefferies » Wed May 25, 2016 10:16 am

Heather I meant to also mention the boxed set of Steele Rudd's (Arthur Hoey Davis) books that are readily available in most second hand bookshops. Marvelous reading and still as funny to day as they were when written.

Heather

Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Heather » Wed May 25, 2016 12:01 pm

Thanks for that Vic. I haven't progressed any further with my reading homework. I've been plodding through "Eureka", which interestingly mentions a lady poet of the goldfields that i had never heard of - Ellen F. Young, who called herself, "The Ballarat Poetess". Poems were regularly published in the newspapers of the 19th century and often had a political or satirical bent to them.

Heather :)

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Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Vic Jefferies » Wed May 25, 2016 2:24 pm

Haven't read Ellen Young but I think perhaps you have hit upon something that would advance the cause of bush poetry greatly when you remind us that poems were often published in the local press "often with a political or satirical bent."
I have had some minor success with having poems published in our local free paper from time to time and have been surprised by the good reception they have received.
Perhaps we need to submit more of our poetry especially that with political or satirical bent to local papers and magazines to increase the public's interest.

Heather

Re: Henry Lawson...myth and reality

Post by Heather » Wed May 25, 2016 3:40 pm

Bob often has his poems published in the local papers. I've had a couple of my war ones published around ANZAC Day or Remembrance Day. It was very common in old newspapers though. I guess it depends on the editor.

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